Tag Exhibits

Experimental Vitiligo Remedy Exhibits Guarantee in Mice

01 March, 22:34, by kealsimpson Tags: , , , , ,


News Picture: Experimental Vitiligo Treatment Shows Promise in Mice

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) — A genetically modified protein could provide the first effective treatment for the skin condition vitiligo, a new study in mice suggests.

People with vitiligo have white patches on the face, hands and other parts of the body. Vitiligo is an autoimmune disorder in which the immune system becomes overactive and kills the pigment cells that give skin its color.

Researchers at the Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine developed a genetically modified protein that reversed vitiligo in mice and had similar effects on human skin tissue samples. Findings from animal studies do not always hold up in human trials, however.

A protein called HSP70i plays a major role in the autoimmune response that causes vitiligo. The researchers genetically modified an amino acid in the protein in order to create a mutant version of HSP70i. This version replaces normal HSP70i and reverses the autoimmune response that causes vitiligo, the study authors explained in a Loyola news release.

When the mutant HSP70i was given to mice with vitiligo, their salt-and-pepper fur turned black, giving them a normal appearance. The mutant protein had a similar effect on human skin samples, according to the study, published in the current issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Researcher I. Caroline Le Poole, a professor in Loyola’s Oncology Institute, and colleagues are seeking approval and funding to conduct a clinical trial of the modified protein in humans.

About 1 million Americans have vitiligo, which affects about one in 200 people worldwide. There are no long-term effective treatments for the condition. Current options include steroid creams, light therapy and skin grafts, but none of them can prevent vitiligo from progressing.

– Robert Preidt

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

SOURCE: Loyola University Health System, news release, Feb. 27, 2013



MedicineNet Skin General

Artificial Skin Heals Itself With a Touch, Research Exhibits

17 November, 03:22, by kealsimpson Tags: , , , , , ,

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) — Scientists say they have created a touch-sensitive plastic “skin” that can heal itself when torn or cut.

The synthetic skin includes a plastic polymer with molecules that can reorganize themselves and restore the structure of the material after it is damaged. Tiny particles of nickel were added to the polymer in order to increase its mechanical strength and its ability to conduct electricity.

The Stanford University team tested the healing ability of the synthetic skin by cutting a piece of it in half with a scalpel. They then gently pressed the pieces together for a few seconds and found that the material quickly regained 75 percent of its original strength and conductivity. Within about a half-hour, the material was nearly 100 percent restored.

Even after being cut and repaired in the same place 50 times, the sample retained its original bending and stretching capabilities.

“Before our work, it was very hard to imagine that this kind of flexible, conductive material could also be self-healing,” Chao Wang, a co-first author of the research, said in a university news release.

Twisting or putting pressure on the synthetic skin changes the distance between the nickel particles and, in turn, the ease with which electrons can move between the particles. These changes in electrical resistance can be translated into information about pressure and tension on the skin.

The material is sensitive enough to detect the pressure of a handshake, and may be ideal for use in artificial limbs, the researchers said. They also suggested that coating electrical devices and wires in this material could give them the ability to repair themselves and restore the flow of electricity without costly and difficult repair work, particularly in hard-to-reach locations such as inside walls or inside vehicles.

The study was published Nov. 11 in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.

– Robert Preidt

MedicalNewsCopyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

SOURCE: Stanford University, news release, Nov. 11, 2012


MedicineNet Skin General